A dark, short form comedy which explores the limits of a relationship between two friends who have no other options. When you’re put in the worst possible situation, can you still come out the same person? Do you feel satisfied with life? Or do you wish for more? Are you content with yourself? Or is there more to explore? Wordless physical and situational theatre created by recent graduates of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland BA Performance in British Sign Language and English course.

ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES:

Connor has just graduated from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland studying in its new, groundbreaking course (BA Performance in British Sign Language and English). Since then he has been a BSL language advisor in the Hit BBC Comedy Two Doors Down working with Joy McAvoy and Sophie Stone. He has also been the assistant director working with Solar Bear on Shaun Tan’s The Arrival. He has just done a tour of Tutti Frutti’s Yellow is the Colour of Sunshine as Yoshi.

Craig McCulloch is a Scottish freelance actor, independent theatre making artist, performer in British Sign Language and Spoken English, and a workshop facilitator. He graduated from Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in 2018, and was part of the first cohort in the new groundbreaking course, BA Performance in BSL/English. Since he has graduated, he has performed in ‘The Arrival’ with Solar Bear in the lead role of Aki, and also has co-led various workshops.For his most recent production ‘Happiness’ with Solar Bear, he was involved as an Assistant Director, along with Director Jonathan Lloyd and cast. They visited different schools in Scotland. The show was an unfinished performance, they collaborated with children in each school and helped finish the performance. It ended with each show being different and unique in their ways.

He has a huge passion for Visual Theatre and is hugely inspired by Ramesh Meyyappan, a well known Visual Theatre Performer/Theatremaker. Drawing from this inspiration, Craig’s ambition is to create visual work for both hearing and deaf audiences so that they are able to enjoy a story by sharing an universal language – visual.